Box beam metal stud

With today's emphasis on building green to save the environment, metal studs are a wise choice as a framing. Using metal studs as a framing material in your home is challenging, especially if you are using standard lumber framing materials.

This includes installing the electrical system inside of the metal framed wall. The electrical components may look similar, but electrical components designed for wood installation will not install in a metal framed wall. Measure up on the stud from the floor with the tape measure. Place a mark on the inside face of the metal stud with the permanent marker at the bottom height you need to install the electrical box.

Align the bottom of the electrical box on your mark and hold the small piece of drywall against the front face of the stud. Move the electrical box until the front edge of the electrical box is even with the outside face of the small piece of drywall. Make sure the bottom edge of the electrical box is still aligned with your mark. Secure the electrical box to the metal stud by placing one leg of the six-inch self-locking C-grips inside of the electrical box and the other leg on the side of the metal stud opposite the side of the stud with the electrical box.

Squeeze the handles of the C-grips together to lock the electrical box in place. Insert the No. Remove the C-grips from the electrical box to finish installing the electrical box to the metal stud. Reasebased in Texas, has been a professional construction and outdoor writer since Rease served a four year apprenticeship to become a union sheet metal journeyman and earned a construction management degree from Florida State University. Hunker may earn compensation through affiliate links in this story.

Mounting an electrical box to metal studs requires self-drilling screws. Step 1 Measure up on the stud from the floor with the tape measure.

Step 2 Align the bottom of the electrical box on your mark and hold the small piece of drywall against the front face of the stud. Step 3 Move the electrical box until the front edge of the electrical box is even with the outside face of the small piece of drywall.

Step 4 Secure the electrical box to the metal stud by placing one leg of the six-inch self-locking C-grips inside of the electrical box and the other leg on the side of the metal stud opposite the side of the stud with the electrical box. Step 5 Insert the No. Step 6 Remove the C-grips from the electrical box to finish installing the electrical box to the metal stud.

Share this article. Show Comments.Cold-formed steel framing is a versatile structural product for use in load-bearing and curtainwall construction, floor and roof assemblies, mansard and truss frames, as well as interior nonstructural partitions.

The popularity of corrosion resistant, galvanized steel framing products can be attributed to these documented benefits:. The use of steel framing products, protected with fire resistive materials, offers the designer numerous rated non-combustible assemblies. Non-combustible fire ratings may also yield long term insurance savings. In curtainwall applications, the reduced dead load of the exterior wall as a result of using steel studs in lieu of masonry may result in primary structural frame and foundation material savings.

Exterior retrofits are less likely to require expensive reinforcement of the existing structure. In load-bearing construction, a lightweight steel framing system is a benefit when the site is plagued by poor soil conditions.

Multi-story residences requiring unique ground level construction parking structures, meeting or dining facilities, etc.

Whether used as curtainwalls, floor joists or roof rafters, or in mansard and truss frames, axially loaded partitions, headers, beams, etc. Steel framing is adaptable to numerous applications traditionally constructed with hot rolled structural steel, wood, masonry or other conventional materials. Steel framing systems are conducive to prefabrication at or away from the job site. Quite often, exterior curtainwalls are partially or entirely prefinished.

Quality is improved due to the controlled work environment of the fabrication shop while its efficiency of construction may result in earlier building enclosure and ultimate occupancy.

In a similar manner, load-bearing walls, platforms, and trusses may be prefabricated to the close tolerances required of these systems. Steel Framing will not shrink or crack. It does not rot and is impenetrable to termites, vermin and insects. Factory punched holes permit easier installation of pipe, cable, telephone and electrical services. Why Use Steel?

The popularity of corrosion resistant, galvanized steel framing products can be attributed to these documented benefits: Non-Combustible Construction The use of steel framing products, protected with fire resistive materials, offers the designer numerous rated non-combustible assemblies.

High Strength-to-Weight Ratio In curtainwall applications, the reduced dead load of the exterior wall as a result of using steel studs in lieu of masonry may result in primary structural frame and foundation material savings. Design Versatility Whether used as curtainwalls, floor joists or roof rafters, or in mansard and truss frames, axially loaded partitions, headers, beams, etc.

Low In-Place and Performance Costs Steel framing systems are conducive to prefabrication at or away from the job site.This unique system provides the benefits of a full protective zinc coating on the inside and outside of the beam.

Boxspan beams allow our customers to substitute timber in many structural applications such as sub-floors, decks and roof frames without the concern of termites.

The beam is strong with high torsional stability and is easy to use as it has similar dimensions to timber. In most applications Boxspan beams require less depth than timber to reach the same span. Boxspan comes in a range of varying beam sizes and gauges from x 50 mm to x 50 mm with base metal thickness BMT of 0.

This ensures that an economical Boxspan beam can be obtained for each individual project. The beams gauge is indicated by the suffix i. B This refers to the total thickness of metal at top and bottom flanges 2 x BMT x Therefore two layers of 0. Available Guages: B B Available Gauges: B B B Available Gauges: B B Available Gauge: B Boxspan beams are produced to controlled tolerances. Generally, beams are manufactured to exact length up to 12 metres and delivered as a designed kit system for a floor or roof frame with no cutting required on site.

You can also design the frames yourself and order the exact lengths you require. In addition, Boxspan beams can also be purchased from a number of stockists in stock lengths and can be easily cut on site. Find a stockist. Mitred corners on wrap around decks and joists attached to bearers at acute angles are typical connections we have simplified.Log In. I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot.

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Students Click Here. Related Projects. I am looking at a typical metal stud boxed header with 2 studs vertical and a track on the top and bottom. What do you consider the unbraced length for bending? Do you assume the top track fully braces the compression flange of the studs? I have always considered this unbraced unless I add a kicker but all the header span tables I have seen state this is the capacity for fully braced. How do you brace a header in the wall over a window that is below the ceiling?

Like you, I generally consider beams to be unbraced for LTB in these situations. It is common practice to consider the track as adequate to brace the flanges. However, The track needs to be checked for out-of-plane wind wind loads from the cripples above. If it can take that, it can typically brace the flanges. There are two different types of bracing involved here- First, locally, the tracks will brace the compression flange of the vertical stud members in the header like a tube.

Globally, the tracks would either need to span horizontally to a bracing mechanism at the ends multiple full height studs or kickersor you add kickers at some spacing across the header to transfer the horizontal loads to the framing above. These two bracing types are independent of each other. Regarding kickers when the ceiling is higher than the header, you can install the kickers above the ceiling and cantilever studs down to brace the header.

It seems as though I am in the wrong on this one. Or, at the very least, in the minority. Certainly, the track could brace the top flange if it possessed sufficient strength and stiffness. Given the modest improvement, however, I'm surprised that this is not something that would be evaluated numerically. Upon further investigation today in the code and comparing different calculation software it looks as if when you compute Lu per AISI this "built up" section is treated like a tube shape.

For 2 S boxed studs with track top and bottom I got an Lu of So it looks like if the unbraced length is less than about 56' lateral torsional bucking isn't checked. With this I used the fully braced condition to calculate the header capacity of 8.S members are preferred for most curtain wall applications.

They also provide the vertical strength necessary for demanding load-bearing structural applications and sufficient strength for many joist applications. This framing member is also used in axial load-bearing wall assemblies. See ClarkDietrich's Product Identification sheet for more on how to identify our products. To keep the catalog from being overloaded, it only includes half the design tables our online tools can offer.

Structural Studs, may be used in a variety of applications and designs. While most conditions require the expertise of a design professional, many systems can be selected based on tabulated data or design tools.

Locate the required assembly below and follow the instructions for selecting the proper design criteria. Typically ProSTUD Drywall Framing is used for interior walls but the use of structural framing may be needed to meet taller requirements. Nonstructural Non-load bearing interior walls must be designed to withstand a minimum of 5 psf lateral load perpendicular to the wall for interior pressure as required by the International Building Code. Loads of 7. The main purpose of specifying an allowable stud lateral deflection for interior wall framing is actually for determining what is an acceptable deflection for the wall facing materials.

Sheathing and Finish materials require a minimum stiffness to prevent cracking. The required stiffness for the finish material is achieved by the specified deflection limit. Limiting heights are based on continuous lateral support gypsum wallboard on each flange over the full height of the stud. If wallboard does not run the full height of the stud, lateral bracing may be required.

Contact ClarkDietrich Technical Services to help determine spacing of the lateral bracing above the wallboard.

Curtain Wall Framing Systems support the exterior skin or cladding of commercial and industrial buildings. The studs for these framing systems must be able to withstand:. Exterior curtain walls are non-axial load bearing and must be designed to withstand the highest lateral loads, wind or seismic, prescribed by the building code for the particular construction location and type.

Limited heights in the above lookup tool and tables are for single span systems only. It is recommended to have a vertical deflection gap between the top of the stud and top track for primary structure movement as required by the E. A deep leg deflection track system is used in this condition.

Exterior curtain walls must be designed to withstand the highest lateral loads anticipated for the particular construction location and type. Required lateral loads for design must be provided by the E. If the wind load being used meets this criterion, it does not need to be modified prior to using the tables.

The main purpose of specifying an allowable stud deflection for curtain wall framing is actually for determining what is an acceptable deflection for the wall facing materials.

A metal stud is ductile and therefore can perform at a wide range of deflections. Wall facing materials tend to be more brittle Brick, Stucco or EIFSand thus have a more stringent maximum allowable deflection. The project architect or project specifications should note what the allowable deflection is for a given wall facing material. Limiting heights are based on continuous lateral support rigid sheathing on each flange over the full height of the stud. Horizontal structural bridging or bracing is defaulted to be at 4 ft.

The actual bridging that is ultimately provided is to be determined by the licensed specialty engineer responsible for the cold-formed steel design for the given project. Contact ClarkDietrich Technical Services to help determine maximum spacing of the lateral bracing. Adding additional horizontal bridging will not reduce the actual deflection in the wall. To reduce the deflection of a wall stud, either a heavier member is required or an intermediate structural support must be provided.

Load-bearing walls must be capable of handling vertical loads even when subjected to lateral loads from wind or another force. The following tables identify the axial vertical load that can be supported by each member under given lateral load conditions.

The superior strength and carrying capacity of the HDS means higher performance with fewer members. It eliminates box beam headers, stud-to-track nesting, built-up members for posts and jambs and has superior axial strength for load-bearing projects.Since the light gauge steel members are usually so thin, these thin elements may buckle at stress levels less than the yield point if they are subjected to compression, shear, bending or bearing.

Local buckling of these thin elements is one of the major design criteria. RSG Software, Inc. Section R All exterior walls installed in accordance with the provisions of this section shall be considered as load-bearing walls.

HDS® Framing System

Steel walls constructed in accordance with the provision of this section shall be limited to sites subjected to a maximum design wind speed of miles per hour, Exposure A, B, or C and a maximum ground snow load of 70 psf.

Do not use the Simpson wood catalog for light gauge steel unless you call the technical support of Simpson company and they say it will work.

If the above conditions cannot be met, use PACO column or steel tube column instead of multiple studs. When you are using the light gauge straps as bracing, Studs lateral bracing shall be provided by bridging only. Wall shall be shown by a line with two arrows specifying the start and end of wall. The line shall have a wall designation mark such as W1 or W5. A table showing wall designation with the size of the studs shall be shown on the floor plan. See project from John hanson.

Be Careful. If you use Pre-engineered products such as Hardy panel or PACO steel or other products, You cannot use the entire wall length at garages. This is because the rough openings for garage doors are 4 inches wider than the garage door size shown on the architectural drawings. At the tub area, do not reduce the joist spacing as we do on wood construction. Instead, double up the joist at the same spacing so the double joist is supported by a stud.

Do not double too many joists. About three double joist at the tub are is enough.Log In. I like to debate structural engineering theory -- a lot. If I challenge you on something, know that I'm doing so because I respect your opinion enough to either change it or adopt it. Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts. The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

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Metal Framing

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box beam metal stud

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box beam metal stud

Related Projects. Please take a look at the attached image from the Steel Stud Mfrs Assoc. I'll withhold my thought briefly. You need to be careful by using the members from the tables which do not tell you anything about the loads and connection details. The structural engineers need to understand the basics, and load path through the member, select the size and detail accordingly. Second: these type of beams are from the material with high strength properties. So welding always is a problem, or difficult.

Third: You need to be careful for the load transfer on the faces of the member since the walls are not thick enough. The same apply at the ends of the beam. You need to think about how you will transfer the loads from the beam to the supporting members. Connection elements such as punching with screw might be needed, and you will be concentration on the details of the connection.

The box member is better selection for the torsional applications in addition to other actions, but you still need to validate that your application is safe, at least meets the code requirements. Corrosion protection is another issue with uncapped member that you need to take care.

How to Attach Electrical Boxes to Metal Studs

The boxed headers are built from studs. They are typically assembled with a track on the top or bottom.

box beam metal stud

Cold formed steel s commonly connected with screws or welds. Often times, welded and screwed alternatives are provided because some contractors prefer welds and some prefer screws.


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